The Wrack: Articles

 blog of the wells reserve at laudholm

The Wrack is our collective logbook on the web. Here you will find hundreds of articles on myriad topics, all tied to these two thousand acres of protected coastal land and the yesteryear cluster that lends them identity.

Why "The Wrack"? In its cycles of ebb and flow, the sea transports a melange of weed, shell, bone, feather, wood, rope, and trash from place to place, then deposits it at the furthest reach of spent surf. This former flotsam is full of interesting stuff for anybody who cares to kneel and take a look. Now and then, the line of wrack reveals a treasure.

Greater white-fronted goose is the latest entry on the Wells Reserve bird checklist. It's the first addition since last summer's king rail and the first new goose since the barnacle five years ago.

Greater White-fronted Goose illustration adapted from public domain image from Wikimedia CommonsThe goose was first reported on March 20 by Fletcher Missud, a regular here, who submitted the sighting to eBird. Josh Fecteau was quick to follow up and David Doubleday got to the bird before sunset.

Josh posted the rarity to maine-birds on Monday night, so I was out first thing Tuesday. Several more hopefuls stopped by over the next couple of days, with the last eBird report being Nathan Hall's: "Afternoon shimmer made the id difficult but the orange legs of this bird gave it away." I never saw the legs. It took patience to see the bird at all.

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Fools Russian

April 1, 2017 By Nik Charov Filed under Article Tags: congressnerranerrstwo worlds

Sad-eyed Albert Einstein.

The following was published in the Biddeford-Saco Journal Tribune Sunday edition, 4/2/2017, and Making It At Home's 4/5/2017 issue.

Over the past three years, it has been the practice of the Wells Reserve at Laudholm to publish a bit of make-believe each April Fool’s Day. We have posted hoax articles to draw attention to real issues like staff changes, invasive species, and the health of local rivers. Unfortunately, this year the truth-blurring antics of President Trump and his staff have convinced us that adding “fake news” to the local scene, even if only in jest, would be counter-productive and irresponsible.

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Kayaking on the Little River Estuary

March 27, 2017 By Suzanne Kahn Filed under Article Tags: estuarykayak

Paddle on calm and quiet waters while observing wildlife and learning about the natural history of estuaries, our treasured habitats.

Dock

2017 is our seventh year offering these popular guided tours led by registered Maine Kayak Guides.

Tour group size is kept small, with a maximum of six participants. Kayaks, paddles, and personal flotation devices are provided. The 3-hour time frame includes a short paddling lesson, 5-minute walk to the launch site and back, and launching of the kayaks. Actual time on the water is between 2 and 2½ hours. Launch times vary depending on tides. See calendar for specifics.

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Join the Chorus #2: The Clause Comes Out

March 24, 2017 By Nik Charov Filed under Article Tags: congressnerranerrsnoaapolicy

Worth fighting for?

The First Amendment to the Constitution of the United States of America reads:

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

The members and visitors and supporters of the Wells Reserve at Laudholm, and the other 28 national estuarine research reserves, are feeling particularly aggrieved. We love that Petition Clause; let's do it. Let's get some of that ol' fashioned redress!

Here are two petitions to sign, via the online platform MoveOn.org.

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Mentioned John Speight

Pictured left to right: Rich Miller, Samuel Prough, Alma Chavez, Alondra Garcia-Diaz, Devin Bruns, Sam Del Molina (Team Leader), Deangelo Brown, Dexter Evans

There’s no one on Laudholm beach when Moose 5, the AmeriCorps team that will spend the next five weeks at the Wells Reserve, arrives at low tide. It’s windy, raw, and the snow has started, but they seem in no hurry to leave. They shrink the chilly gap between their shoulders and ears, and face the ocean.

If not for AmeriCorps National Civilian Community Corps (NCCC), it’s likely we would not be standing here together. I would not have met Deangelo, who lives just outside of Detroit, or Alondra from Southern California. I would not know about Dexter’s encounter with a large whale off the side of a Navy ship, or that Team Leader Sam has hiked sections of the Appalachian Trail.

And they would not know how beautiful an empty winter beach in Maine can be.

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