The Wrack

The Wrack is the Wells Reserve blog, our collective logbook on the web.

Posts tagged climate change

  • Rounding Second

    | August 21, 2016

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/29381982@N08/12043928655

    The following was published in the Biddeford-Saco Journal Tribune Sunday edition, 8/21/2016, and Making It At Home's 8/24/2016 issue.

    August 21st is my 38th birthday. The odometer keeping track of my trips around the Sun just rolled over 22.2 billion miles. There’s still plenty of tread on the tires. I am beginning to notice a few twinges of maturity, though. Joint pains, hair loss, reflexive stubbornness, the irrepressible need to give advice – the signs of creeping codgerdom.

  • Wells Reserve to Help Beach Businesses Prepare for Storms

    | May 3, 2016 | Filed under: News

    Beach-based businesses, a powerful economic engine for Maine, are generally little prepared for storm surge and coastal flooding. Yet lessons learned from previous disasters underscore how important the recovery of businesses is to the overall recovery of a region’s economy.

  • Spring Fever

    | March 20, 2016

    Spring is dawning

    The following was published in the Biddeford-Saco Journal Tribune Sunday edition, 3/20/2016, and Making It At Home's 3/23/2016 issue.

    My wife and I and our two boys moved up to Maine full-time in July 2012. We felt like we’d arrived in the Garden of Eden. Lobsters were four bucks, the ocean was 73 degrees, and the outdoor season stretched well into November. It wasn’t the Maine I knew from my childhood (swimmable water!?), but who cared? It was awesome.

  • What Do We Talk About When We Talk About the Weather?

    | January 23, 2016

    Snow blowing past the big barn's double doors, February 5, 2015

    The following was published in the Biddeford-Saco Journal Tribune Sunday edition of 1/24/16 and Making It At Home Thursday edition, 1/28/2016.

    Always eager to start some new long-term monitoring project, I’m now keeping track of the number of conversations I have about the weather. I’m planning to henceforth keep tabs on with whom, when, and for how long we chatted. I’m already certain one thing will be constant: the changing weather will be discussed in only the most general, equivocal, unchanging terms. You and I will talk about the weather, my friends, but we will say nothing new.

  • What An Atheist Believes In This Christmas

    | December 20, 2015

    mythic

    Santa visited the Wells Reserve at Laudholm this summer. One of these statements is false.

    The following was published in the Biddeford-Saco Journal Tribune Sunday edition, 12/20/2015.

    [Trigger warning: the following paragraph may contain troubling information for preteens]

    Like many parents, my wife and I get a real kick out of the Santa thing. There’s something delicious about a full month of lying, straight-faced, to our eight-year-old and five-year-old. Usually we’re trying to dispel myths, convey science, explain the world, and correct pronunciation. Come Christmas season, we just start making @#$# up. The holidays are a wonderful vacation from reality, aren’t they?

  • Piqued

    | October 18, 2015

    burning beech

    The following was published in the Biddeford-Saco Journal Tribune Sunday edition, 10/18/2015.

    Welcome to Southern Maine and “peak foliage.” Those blazing reds and oranges along the Turnpike and our back roads are a sight to behold. Of course, I’m talking about brake lights.

  • Living on the Edge

    | September 19, 2015

    On the edge

    The following was published in the Biddeford-Saco Journal Tribune Sunday edition, 9/20/2015, and Making It At Home newspaper.

    To a man with a hammer, everything looks like a nail. To a man at a coastal research center during Maine Coast Week, all the world’s a coast.

  • Remembering Katrina, Part II: Could It Happen Here?

    | August 25, 2015

    Picture: Julio Cortez/APMantoloking, New Jersey, October 30, 2012.

    The following was published in the Biddeford-Saco Journal Tribune Sunday edition, 8/30/2015. (Continued from Remembering Katrina, Part I.)

    Ten years ago this week, Category 3 Hurricane Katrina left nearly 2,000 people dead, hundreds of communities uprooted, and more than $100 billion in damage along the Gulf Coast. Adding in Superstorm Sandy’s devastation in October 2012, just two events swallowed the equivalent of: five months of Medicare spending, or two years of the federal education budget, or four years’ worth of the Federal Highway Trust Fund, our national gasoline tax-funded infrastructure bank that is now running on empty. So much money, washed out to sea.

  • Remembering Katrina, Part I

    | August 23, 2015

    the Lower Ninth Ward

    The following was published in the Biddeford-Saco Journal Tribune Sunday edition, 8/23/2015.

    Perhaps a butterfly flapped its wings in Hong Kong, or perhaps the gods who play dice with the sky rolled double sixes. Whatever the cause, the atmospheric disturbance that formed over the southeastern Bahamas on August 23, 2005, would go on to have massive effects.

  • Getting Off My Horse High

    | August 9, 2015

    The great a-tractor

    The following was published in the Biddeford-Saco Journal Tribune Sunday edition, 8/9/2015.

    My car, a Volkswagen Jetta with a diesel engine, generates 140 horsepower. I sometimes imagine what it would be like to ride in a horse-drawn carriage down I-95 to my office at the Wells Reserve at Laudholm, towed by 140 horses. Using eight feet as the average length of a horse, and pairing the horses together, my anachronistic folk’s wagon would rumble along behind an equine train more than 560 feet long.

    I wonder what our top speed would be.