The Wrack

The Wrack is the Wells Reserve blog, our collective logbook on the web.

Posts tagged disaster response

  • Remembering Katrina, Part II: Could It Happen Here?

    | August 25, 2015

    Picture: Julio Cortez/APMantoloking, New Jersey, October 30, 2012.

    The following was published in the Biddeford-Saco Journal Tribune Sunday edition, 8/30/2015. (Continued from Remembering Katrina, Part I.)

    Ten years ago this week, Category 3 Hurricane Katrina left nearly 2,000 people dead, hundreds of communities uprooted, and more than $100 billion in damage along the Gulf Coast. Adding in Superstorm Sandy’s devastation in October 2012, just two events swallowed the equivalent of: five months of Medicare spending, or two years of the federal education budget, or four years’ worth of the Federal Highway Trust Fund, our national gasoline tax-funded infrastructure bank that is now running on empty. So much money, washed out to sea.

  • Disaster(s) Preparedness

    | June 14, 2014

    photo by Eileen Willard

    The following was published in the Biddeford-Saco Journal Tribune Sunday edition, 6/15/2014.

    When Facilities Manager John Speight watched a pickup truck accidentally drive into what he’d thought was a well-protected propane tank at the Wells Reserve at Laudholm last weekend, his first thought was: “I hear the hiss, so I’m still alive.”

    His second thought was: “let’s keep it that way.”

  • Disaster Response Plan for Wells Reserve and Its Watersheds

    | March 5, 2014

    Goal

    Develop a disaster response plan for the Wells Reserve and surrounding watersheds that complements and coordinates with local and county efforts and that will serve as a model for other natural resource organizations and agencies.

    Bridge washout on Skinner Mill Road due to 2006 Mother's Day stormWhy Do This Project?

    The Julie N oil spill in Portland Harbor (1996), Mother's Day storm (2006), and Patriot's Day storm (2007) caused extensive environmental and infrastructure damage to the coastal areas of southwest Maine. More recently this region was narrowly spared the great devastation caused by Hurricanes Irene (2011) and Sandy (2012). These events have reinforced that:

    • the occurrence of natural and man-made disasters is unpredictable
    • a lack of preparation can result in a slower and less efficient response
    • resilience of natural resources and man-made infrastructure to disasters can be "built in" in advance to some degree