The Wrack

The Wrack is the Wells Reserve blog, our collective logbook on the web.

Posts tagged maine beaches conference

  • Being a Research Intern at the Wells Reserve

    Wells Reserve Contributor | August 3, 2015

    Crab TrappingAs an environmentalist, I'm interested in the relationship between human communities and their environments. That is, how human activities have impacted watershed environments, coastal ecologies, and others alike. The opposite perspective is also how environmental changes such as climate change and sea level rise are affecting human communities especially in coastal regions. I want to learn more about these environmental issues and explore the possibilities of conservation techniques that could benefit both sides.

    As a research intern at the reserve this summer, I was keen to discover more about these topics with NOAA and how relevant it was to my past research opportunities. I have been involved in several different projects that are tide-dependent and require different monitoring/research skills.

  • Volunteers Track Long-Term Trends in Beach Erosion

    | January 22, 2015

    Wells Reserve is looking for volunteers to assist with year-round data collection at beaches in Kennebunkport, Kennebunk, Wells, Ogunquit, and York.

    If you are interested in helping out please contact Jacob Aman at jacobaman@wellsnerr.org or 646-1555 ext 112.

    To learn more, please check out the Southern Maine Beach Profile Monitoring Program web page.

    Ogunquit BeachSand beaches represent only a small portion of Maine’s coastline. Even so, they are incredibly valuable economically as well for recreational opportunities, important wildlife habitat, and mitigating the effects of coastal storms.  Sand beaches are subject to the effects of human engineering and the natural forces of sea level rise and climate change.  Manmade structures such as sea walls and jetties disrupt the natural movement of sand along the beach creating areas of erosion.  These alterations combined with rising sea level and increased frequency and severity of storms have contributed to an overall net loss of sand. These changes are of enough importance that in 2006 the Maine legislature created a beach stakeholders group to develop recommendations for protecting Maine's beaches.