The Wrack

The Wrack is the Wells Reserve blog, our collective logbook on the web.

Posts tagged migratory fish

  • Spring 2016 Fish Monitoring

    | March 15, 2016

    Brook Trout in the hand.This spring, our research staff will be heading out to nearby rivers to begin a fish-monitoring project and you can get involved.

    We're collaborating with the Maine Department of Marine Resources (DMR) to generate up-to-date population information on species with the greatest conservation need in coastal Maine. DMR staff have identified potential spawning habitat for diadromous species such as alewife, rainbow smelt, and brook trout in the Merriland River, Mousam River, and Little River (Biddeford). Now we’re off too see if these species are indeed using these habitats.

  • Being a Research Intern at the Wells Reserve

    Wells Reserve Contributor | August 3, 2015

    Crab TrappingAs an environmentalist, I'm interested in the relationship between human communities and their environments. That is, how human activities have impacted watershed environments, coastal ecologies, and others alike. The opposite perspective is also how environmental changes such as climate change and sea level rise are affecting human communities especially in coastal regions. I want to learn more about these environmental issues and explore the possibilities of conservation techniques that could benefit both sides.

    As a research intern at the reserve this summer, I was keen to discover more about these topics with NOAA and how relevant it was to my past research opportunities. I have been involved in several different projects that are tide-dependent and require different monitoring/research skills.

  • This is the PITs

    | May 6, 2014

    asdfIn his recent post, Spreading the Fish Ladder News, Jake mentioned our imminent use of passive integrated transponders, or PIT tags, to track fish. But just what is a PIT tag and exactly how does it work?

    A passive integrated transponder is a miniature electronic circuit typically encased in glass and implanted under an animal's skin or in a body cavity (the fish tags we'll use are thin and just 12mm long). Each tag is programmed with a unique number to identify an individual animal. That number is read automatically when the animal travels close to a receiving station.