The Wrack

The Wrack is the Wells Reserve blog, our collective logbook on the web.

Posts tagged monitoring

  • Casco Bay Island Invasion!

    | October 29, 2013

    For the last 6 years, myself and a group of trained citizen scientist have been monitoring marine invasive species on docks, rocky shores, and tide pools as part of the Marine Invader Monitoring and Information Collaborative, or MIMIC.

  • Sandy by the numbers

    | October 31, 2012

    Hi Everyone,

    Thought I would share some numbers from our System Wide Monitoring Program (SWMP) weather station here at the Reserve, and compare them to some values from around the area. First off, it seems we got "lucky" with rain fall totals. Both the Reserve station and the Portland International Jetport weather station reported just over an inch of rain on Tuesday. However rainfall totals varied a bit depending on where those "bands" of precipitation hit… pretty minor event as far as actual rainfall goes, but when that rain is being blown sideways at close to 60mph. Speaking of wind…

  • Team Larval Fish at the Wells Reserve

    Wells Reserve Contributor | July 2, 2012 | Filed under: Observations

    Fellow Research Intern Tim Dubay and I have been working with Jeremy Miller this summer to expand the Wells Reserve’s ongoing larval fish project. We're "Team Larval Fish!"

  • A wet start to June!

    | June 6, 2012

    We saw a cold and wet start to the month of June here in Southern Maine. I thought I would share some SWMP data from a few of our stations to illustrate how weather can significantly impact the water quality of our estuaries

  • Post-Restoration Fish Habitat Monitoring for Shoreys Brook

    | March 2, 2012

    Goal

    Determine the presence or absence of diadromous rainbow smelt and appropriate habitat within the restored area of Shoreys Brook

    Project Period

    March and April 2012

  • Hurricane Irene SWMP Report

    | August 29, 2011

    So looks as if we got a bit "lucky" and missed the brunt of Hurricane Irene as the storm passed to our west dropping large amounts of rain on western New Hampshire and parts of Massachusetts and Vermont. Here are some totals from our System Wide Monitoring Program (SWMP) weather station behind the Coastal Ecology Center.

  • Ichthyoplankton sampling begins aboard the EPA's OSV Bold

    Wells Reserve Contributor | August 8, 2011

    I am on board the EPA Ocean Survey Vessel BOLD, with the opportunity to do ichthyoplankton (larval fish) monitoring at sea to supplement the nearly weekly ichthyoplankton tows my fellow intern Amanda has been doing this summer at Wells Harbor.  We are interested in comparing the types of larval fish that are present a little way out to sea with those present in the harbor. Darcie Ritch, another summer intern who is working on her master’s degree at Antioch New England, is hoping to use the larval fish data I’m helping to collect on this trip in her masters project. Here is one of the first creatures we caught, a tiny lobster.

    Juvenile lobster

    The EPA’s OSV BOLD is dedicated to environmental research at sea.  This specific trip goes from Boston to Casco Bay and back, and is focused on collecting water samples to help establish nutrient limits (the maximum quantities of nitrates and phosphates in the water that will still allow healthy animal and plant life and clean water for fishing, kayaking, and other uses) for coastal waters.

    To learn more about the OSV BOLD, and to see more photos and some videos of research at sea, check out http://epa.gov/boldkids/!

  • Picture Post: Monitoring Habitat Change Over Time

    | June 18, 2010

    Quick Links: OverlookBeachFieldSalt MarshYankee Woodlot

    With a camera and a computer you have everything you need to monitor habitat change over time at the Wells Reserve.

  • MIMIC: Marine Invader Monitoring and Information Collaborative

    | May 25, 2010

    Marine InvasivesThe Marine Invader Monitoring and Information Collaborative (MIMIC) is a network of trained volunteers, scientists, and state and federal workers who monitor marine invasive species along the Gulf of Maine. The collaborative provides an opportunity for the general public to actively participate in an invasive species early detection network, identify new invaders before they spread out of control, and help improve our understanding of the behavior of established invaders. More than 100 volunteers are monitoring 38 sites in Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Maine.

  • Wettest and warmest March in Maine history

    | April 14, 2010

    With the impressive amounts of rain in the last month or so, and some unusually warm temperatures in March and early April, I thought I would share some of the more interesting weather trends we recorded through our System Wide Monitoring Program here at the reserve. March was the wettest and warmest on record for the state of Maine!