The Wrack

The Wrack is the Wells Reserve blog, our collective logbook on the web.

Posts tagged noaa

  • Join the Chorus #2: The Clause Comes Out

    | March 24, 2017 | Filed under: Opinion

    Here are two petitions to sign, one to express your support of the Wells Reserve and another to extend that support to the National Estuarine Research Reserve System.

  • Join the Chorus

    | March 10, 2017 | Filed under: Opinion

    An open letter to all lovers of nature, science, beauty, and Maine’s coast.

  • Is the National Reserve System in Danger?

    | March 9, 2017 | Filed under: News

    The President's budget eliminates funding for the National Estuarine Research Reserve System in the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2018. The complete budget process includes Congress, however, which is demonstrating it has its own spending priorities.

    Last update: July 28, 2017

  • Some Estuary Love Out of Washington

    | March 3, 2017 | Filed under: News

    We like the sound of a new caucus announced this week. The Congressional Estuary Caucus is a bipartisan group focused on the importance of estuaries to the nation's environment, communities, and economy.

  • Wells Reserve Director Paul Dest Receives National Conservation Award

    | December 13, 2016 | Filed under: News

    Kennebunk resident Paul Dest, for 16 years the director of the Wells National Estuarine Research Reserve, was honored on December 12 with the 2016 Dr. Nancy Foster Habitat Conservation Award from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Dest was presented with his award at the National Summit on Coastal and Estuarine Restoration and 25th meeting of The Coastal Society in New Orleans.

  • Marking Murky Milestones

    | August 26, 2016

    When I heard that the Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge would be celebrating its 50th anniversary this summer, I thought "Cool, and I was there at the beginning."

    I remember my family taking a jaunt down Route 9 from my grandparents' house in Kennebunk after a ho-hum conversation about some Rachel Carson land that had just opened up. After a short drive, we piled out of grandpa's Bonneville and walked into the woods.

    A summer 1970 visit to Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge.

    The day was bright, but the sun was muted by a closed canopy most of the way. We strolled along in single file, following a path softened by pine needles, until we reached an opening where sunlight burst through to the forest floor. The effect was profound: Beaming light, a scent of pine and sea air, and an enveloping quiet that belied the presence of my brothers and me. I've no idea how long that moment lingered or how the spell was broken, but I recall that glade as a cathedral, that instant a locus. I was in awe. In Nature.

  • New England Research Reserves in Sync

    Wells Reserve Contributor | April 6, 2015

    A few weeks back we hosted a New England regional meeting for reserves located in Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island. In attendance were approximately 40 staff members from the four reserves spanning research, education, stewardship, coastal training, managers, and friends.

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    As an employee of the Wells Reserve for almost a year now, I had the privilege of attending this meeting and learning more about how the reserve system works as a whole, how neighboring reserves strive to work together, and how staff members collaborate on ideas.

  • Alphabet Soup and the Budget

    | March 3, 2015

    Paul's off to Washington this week for the annual alphabet soup convention, a/k/a budget pushing time in DC. The first week of March is customarily when NOAA's CZM programs — the NERRS and the SGCPs — get together with EPA's NEPs for a few days on the hill. Reserve director Dest will hunch over the tureen with his colleagues to taste test their parent agencies' justifications for spending. They'll explore nuances and compare notes, discerning seasonings before whisking to their respective Congressional offices to explain why the assembled ingredients blend to perfection.

    A bowl of alphabet soup. Adapted from a photograph by strawberryblues [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons.The estuarine reserves make a palatable mélange. Operating the 28 sites requires less than 4% of the National Ocean Service (NOS) budget and just 0.3% of NOAA's $6 billion request.

  • Chilean and Colombian Delegation Visits Reserve and Refuge

    | May 30, 2014

    South American delegates participating in a New England study tour, out on the Little River marsh, May 2014A delegation of directors and managers of protected areas in Chile and Colombia visited the Wells Reserve and Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge on May 25 to gather insights into programs and activities at refuges and research reserves. The nine Chileans and Colombians were from national parks, forests, and sanctuaries.

    Staff from the Wells Reserve, Rachel Carson Refuge, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Gulf of Maine Coastal Program led the delegation on a tour of the reserve and the refuge. Delegates learned about research in areas such as climate change impacts on estuarine and coastal ecosystems, salt marsh response to sea level rise, endangered shorebird management and protection, early successional habitat management activities benefiting a range of wildlife species, river restoration, and tracking fish movement between fresh and salt water. They viewed fish being caught and tagged at the newly restored fish ladder on Branch Brook and viewed a 2,000-year-old salt marsh peat sample in the Reserve’s research laboratory.

  • Say It With Us: I ♥ Estuaries

    | February 11, 2014

    I Heart Estuaries imageOn February 12, 13, and 14 raise your voice on behalf of estuaries. Join our #iheartestuaries campaign to reach Congress with a simple message: "I love estuaries and this is why…"

    Let your legislators know you want the NERR System funded at current levels in FY 2015. Here's how:

    • Telephone, email, or tweet Maine's federal legislators.
    • Share the "I Heart Estuaries" campaign on your favorite social media outlet(s).
    • Write a cordial, concise note to each of Maine's federal legislators and put it in the mail. Use a postcard, letterhead, nice stationery, or a Valentine's card. Feel free to use the templates below to get started.
    • Ask your friends and family to get involved, too.