The Wrack

The Wrack is the Wells Reserve blog, our collective logbook on the web.

Posts tagged research

  • Research Volunteer Discovers "Little Monster" in Harbor Samples

    | March 6, 2018 | Filed under: Observations

    With the practiced eye of a marine scientist, a post-career volunteer finds an uncommon copepod in a Wells Harbor plankton sample.

  • Who's Edna? No: What's eDNA?

    | March 2, 2018 | Filed under: Program Reports

    Environmental DNA could dramatically change the way reserve scientists survey streams, rivers, and estuaries for finfish and crustaceans.

  • Wells Reserve to Expand Fisheries Science and Conflict Management Research

    | October 18, 2017 | Filed under: News

    Wells Reserve is expanding fisheries science and conflict management research thanks to two grants from the NERRS Science Collaborative.

  • Community Makes York River Fish Study a Success

    | June 15, 2017 | Filed under: Observations

    We got lots of help over 10 weeks of fyke netting in the York River and added 3,759 fish records to our database. The results will be included in a report to the York River Wild and Scenic Committee.

  • Story Map: Larval Fish

    | June 6, 2017 | Filed under: Observations

    Introduction to the larval fish monitoring done by reserve scientists at Wells Harbor.

  • Rainbow Smelt in the York River

    Tyler Spillane
    | May 15, 2017 | Filed under: Observations

    Fyke netting in the York River in April and May 2017 resulted in well over 1,000 rainbow smelt caught and released, plus evidence of successful spawning in the river.

  • New Research Director at Wells Reserve

    | July 20, 2016 | Filed under: News

    Dr. Jason Goldstein portraitWELLS, Maine, July 20, 2016 — Dr. Jason Goldstein is the new research director at the Wells National Estuarine Research Reserve. Goldstein will oversee the Wells Reserve’s fish studies, salt marsh restoration activities, and long-term environmental monitoring program. He intends to expand the reserve’s shellfish program, currently focused on green crab research, into lobster and Jonah crab ecology. Goldstein was selected after a national search and started at the reserve in June.

  • Spring 2016 Fish Monitoring

    | March 15, 2016

    Brook Trout in the hand.This spring, our research staff will be heading out to nearby rivers to begin a fish-monitoring project and you can get involved.

    We're collaborating with the Maine Department of Marine Resources (DMR) to generate up-to-date population information on species with the greatest conservation need in coastal Maine. DMR staff have identified potential spawning habitat for diadromous species such as alewife, rainbow smelt, and brook trout in the Merriland River, Mousam River, and Little River (Biddeford). Now we’re off too see if these species are indeed using these habitats.

  • 2015 Green Crab Trapping Update

    Wells Reserve Contributor | November 6, 2015

    We've processed all the catch from another season of trapping green crabs (Carcinus maenas) and have some preliminary results to report.

    Between June and October we caught 6,432 green crabs. This is merely half the number of crabs as last year! In the figure below you can see that the catch was not distributed equally across the three trapping sites. Trends in numbers were similar to those seen last year. Again, the most crabs were caught in the Webhannet River, Wells (3,848) and the least in Broad Cove, Yarmouth (284).

     

  • Dam Removal Opens Brook Habitat to Migratory Fish

    | September 21, 2015 | Filed under: News

    WELLS, Maine, September 21, 2015 — On September 18, a small dam was removed from Goff Mill Brook in Arundel near where it flows into the Kennebunk River estuary. The removal reconnects seven miles of stream habitat to the estuary, benefiting brook trout, other migratory and freshwater fish, and the watershed’s ecology. The project was coordinated by the Wells National Estuarine Research Reserve, working in full partnership with the Sebago Chapter of Trout Unlimited under TU’s national Embrace-a-Stream grant program.

    “Goff Mill Brook is now connected to the Gulf of Maine for the first time in at least 60 years,” said Wells Reserve project manager Jake Aman. “We expect many fish and wildlife species to benefit from this restoration, including commercially important fish like American eel and river herring.”