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The Wrack

The Wrack is the Wells Reserve blog, our collective logbook on the web.

Posts tagged science

  • Our Fathers, Who Art in Science

    | June 21, 2015

    Fodder for pundits

    The following was published in the Biddeford-Saco Journal Tribune Sunday edition, 6/21/2015.

    As I stood in the kitchen of my New York apartment coming to grips with the news of my father’s sudden death, something spooky happened. One of my father’s favorite tunes, “Always Look on the Bright Side of Life” from the Monty Python film The Life of Brian, began playing. My father had been found dead only hours before, and now a clear reminder of him was spontaneously emanating from some luggage in the corner.

    I assumed it was a cell phone ringtone, but standing there, in that most alone moment of my life, I had no explanation for why someone would be phoning a suitcase, or why “my father’s song” was suddenly playing.

  • Shots First, Ask Questions Later

    | February 7, 2015

    ouch

    The following was published in the Biddeford-Saco Journal Tribune Sunday edition, 2/8/2015.

    In America, enshrined in our First Amendment, we have a right to voicing our own opinions. But ever since the Charlie Hebdo attacks in France, I’ve been thinking about whether free speech does have limits. If what I say ends up hurting others, or even myself, I may have a right to say it… but should I?

  • The Great Thing About Science Is...

    | January 15, 2015 | Filed under: Opinion

    It is NOT about easy answers, shortcuts, or even a-ha revelations. Why on earth is that great?

  • Wells Reserve Hosts Workshop on "Blue Carbon" Science

    | December 8, 2014 | Filed under: News

    Group photo of 'blue carbon

    WELLS, Maine, December 8, 2014 — Scientists from around New England met at the Wells National Estuarine Research Reserve on December 5 for a workshop focused on “blue carbon” science and policy. For the first time, scientists from throughout the region gathered to share research results, identify gaps in knowledge, and plan future collaborations involving carbon in coastal habitats.

    The term “blue carbon” refers to the ability of salt marshes, seagrass meadows, and mangrove forests to take up and store carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases from the atmosphere. Coastal wetlands capture carbon and store it at rates even greater than rainforests.

    “Carbon held naturally in coastal wetlands is not entering the atmosphere as a greenhouse gas, so these habitats have real potential to mitigate climate change,” said Dr. Kristin Wilson, Wells Reserve research director, who co-coordinated the workshop.

  • Winter Wonder Wander

    | December 6, 2014

    Future Scientist

    The following was published in the Biddeford-Saco Journal Tribune Sunday edition, 12/7/2014.

    My family likes to takes walks, particularly in the fall and winter. Given the calories we’re consuming lately, and the long nights given over to reading and TV, we’re trying to grab every opportunity we can to stretch our legs and lungs outside.

    While golf may be a great way to spoil a long walk, as the saying goes, fortunately there’s nothing like the scientific method to enhance a little wander through the woods. Proposing, testing, and analyzing hypotheses prevents hypothermia by keeping the brain warm, I tell my wife and kids. They roll their eyes… but then we find something to examine.

  • Wells National Paranormal Research Reserve?

    | October 31, 2014

    boo!

    On September 26, 2013, the Wells Reserve invited a team of ghosthunters from New Hampshire, the Seeking the Unknown Realm Society, to spend a dark and eerie night poking through the basements, barns, attics and outbuildings of the Wells Reserve.

    Accompanied by [skeptical] Reserve educators Suzanne Kahn, Kate Reichert, and Caretaker Ed, the ghosthunters deployed their electromagnetic field (EMF) detectors, infrared cameras, and flickery flashlights across "old Laudholm Farm."

    What they found surprised and shocked them.