The Wrack

The Wrack is the Wells Reserve blog, our collective logbook on the web.

Posts tagged watershed

  • Teaching about Coastal Impacts of Climate Change

    | March 11, 2017

    We are putting teachers on the estuary again this summer by offering a free workshop that will give educators data-driven climate change activities to bring back to their classes. The workshop will train up to ten educators in reserve-style environmental monitoring, "coastal blue carbon" concepts, and ways to understand and address climate change.

  • Salmon Falls Watershed Collaborative

    | January 4, 2012

    Building Capacity and Collaborating to Protect Drinking Water

    The Piscataqua Region Estuaries Partnership convened the Salmon Falls Watershed Collaborative to improve watershed planning and management — and to protect water supply sources — in the Salmon Falls River watershed.

  • Watershed Restoration Field Trip

    | October 14, 2011

    On October 5th the Coastal Training Program partnered with Protect Kittery Waters, Spruce Creek Association, FB Environmental, Robert's Maine Grill, and the Great Works Regional Land Trust to host a day-long field trip showcasing watershed restoration efforts on Spruce Creek and Shorey's Brook. The day began at Kittery Town Hall where Mary Ann Conroy (Public Works, Kittery) and William Straub (CMA Engineers) spoke about the tree box filter and raingarden they installed with Maine DEP 319 funding.

    KTH Raingarden

  • Watershed Hike

    Wells Reserve Contributor | June 30, 2011

    I participated in a watershed hike this past Tuesday in the York and Kittery Water Districts. Not only did we see the beauty of the trails around Mount Agamenticus, but concepts about the larger context of the watersheds were discussed. Water district staff and operators attended along with watershed groups, land trusts, and other municipal staff involved with source water protection. After a quick introduciton and history talk on top of Mt. Agamenticus, the group embarked on a 1.5 mile hike through the York and Kittery Watersheds.

  • Conservation Focus Areas of Maine's Piscataqua region

    | January 3, 2011

    The Land Conservation Plan for Maine’s Piscataqua Region Watersheds aims to identify and describe areas that represent the best opportunities to conserve the critical ecological, biological, and water resources of southern Maine's coastal watersheds. These Conservation Focus Areas (CFA) are presented in the plan as a series of double-sided pages that include a map of each specific area plus detailed information about its significant resources. Each CFA fact sheet is available individually here:

  • Land Conservation Plan for Maine's Piscataqua Region Watersheds

    Wells Reserve Contributor | July 22, 2010

    The Piscataqua Region Estuaries Partnership has released its Land Conservation Plan for Maine's Piscataqua Region Watersheds (14MB PDF).

    The plan provides a scientific and experienced-based guide for the protection of natural resources vital to thriving communities. It is designed to assist citizens who are involved in sustaining and improving their communities by serving on select boards, planning boards, conservation commissions, economic development boards, schools, or non-profit community organizations such as land trusts, watershed coalitions, conservation groups, and recreation clubs.

  • Maine Road-Stream Crossing Survey in Full Swing

    | July 14, 2010

    Road-Stream CulvertThis summer, the Wells Reserve is an active participant in the Maine Road-Stream Crossing Survey: a joint project of the Maine Forest Service and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Gulf of Maine Coastal Program. Four teams comprising of summer interns and Reserve employees are surveying the culverts of the Kennebunk River Watershed to see if they pose barriers to fish and wildlife passage.

  • Status of watershed conservation in southern Maine

    | December 4, 2009

    The Wells Reserve has produced or assisted with every key conservation planning document prepared for southern Maine watersheds over the past decade. The most recent issue of the Watermark newsletter includes a chart to show which plans cover each town and watershed. You can download the watershed conservation chart below (it's a small PDF).