The Wrack

The Wrack is the Wells Reserve blog, our collective logbook on the web.

Posts tagged weather

  • Harbor Station Comes Back Online

    | May 24, 2019 | Filed under: Program Reports

    A glitch gets fixed and our home page "current conditions" bar returns to delivering weather and water data.

  • A Storm "Most Challenging"

    | January 9, 2018 | Filed under: Observations

    A load of snow, powerful winds, storm surge, and frigid air kick off 2018.

  • Hurricane Relief Sent to Texas and Puerto Rico Estuarine Reserves

    | September 28, 2017 | Filed under: News

    Laudholm Trust sends emergency relief funds to the Mission-Aransas Reserve in Texas and Jobos Bay Reserve in Puerto Rico to support recovery and rebuilding efforts after devastating hurricanes.

  • Record-setting Crafts Festival in 2016

    | September 12, 2016 | Filed under: Culture

    This year's Laudholm Nature Crafts Festival was the kind of community we should all want to live in. More than 160 volunteers worked together as a tireless, friendly, and welcoming team to make 3,500 visitors and 122 participating artisans feel like there was no better place to be.

  • Spring Fever

    | March 20, 2016

    Spring is dawning

    The following was published in the Biddeford-Saco Journal Tribune Sunday edition, 3/20/2016, and Making It At Home's 3/23/2016 issue.

    My wife and I and our two boys moved up to Maine full-time in July 2012. We felt like we’d arrived in the Garden of Eden. Lobsters were four bucks, the ocean was 73 degrees, and the outdoor season stretched well into November. It wasn’t the Maine I knew from my childhood (swimmable water!?), but who cared? It was awesome.

  • What Do We Talk About When We Talk About the Weather?

    | January 23, 2016

    Snow blowing past the big barn's double doors, February 5, 2015

    The following was published in the Biddeford-Saco Journal Tribune Sunday edition of 1/24/16 and Making It At Home Thursday edition, 1/28/2016.

    Always eager to start some new long-term monitoring project, I’m now keeping track of the number of conversations I have about the weather. I’m planning to henceforth keep tabs on with whom, when, and for how long we chatted. I’m already certain one thing will be constant: the changing weather will be discussed in only the most general, equivocal, unchanging terms. You and I will talk about the weather, my friends, but we will say nothing new.

  • The Outlook from January 8

    | January 8, 2016

    It's been well over a week since our few inches of snow fell and we've been through a a number of melt/freeze cycles over that time. Skis and snowshoes won't be much fun; wear sturdy boots and take your time on the uneven and sometimes icy surface.

    NWS forecast graphic for January 9-10, 2016Weather is not looking great. Your best bet this weekend is probably Saturday afternoon. Be careful early Saturday, as the roads might be slick. The skies brighten for the start of the work week.

    We have no public programs this weekend, and the Visitor Center is closed until April, but next Wednesday at lunch time Sue Bickford will talk about Soundscape Ecology in Mather Auditorium.

  • Snowball Warming

    | February 20, 2015

    going, going, going...

    The following was published in the Biddeford-Saco Journal Tribune Sunday edition, 2/22/2015.

    I learned a new word this year. Subnivean, from the Latin for “under” (sub) and “snow” (nives). It’s the zone within and underneath the snowpack. It’s where we’ve all been living lately.

  • On Death and Defiance

    | October 4, 2014

    Which side are you on?Figure 1: A chart of the scientific consensus on climate change (97% of scientists agree that humans are driving global warming), and how much attention the minority opinion seems to receive in the media. Or is it a graph of the amount of America's wealth controlled by the top 3% (54.5%), vs. the bottom 97%?

     

    The following was published in the Biddeford-Saco Journal Tribune Sunday edition, 10/5/2014.

    Two weeks ago, my family and I were perched on the steps of the grand fountain in Columbus Circle, Manhattan, watching 300,000 people march past. They sang, they shouted, and they carried thousands of messages, all communicating one thing: world leaders, it’s time to do something about climate change. A week of action followed. Further protests spread around the world, corporations declared carbon reduction goals, and even presidents and prime ministers frankly spoke of “addressing the need to revise a framework for negotiation.”

    That’s some progress, anyway.

  • Disaster Response Plan for Wells Reserve and Its Watersheds

    | March 5, 2014 | Filed under: Program Reports

    We have developed a disaster response plan for the Wells Reserve and surrounding watersheds that complements and coordinates with local and county efforts and that will serve as a model for other natural resource organizations and agencies.