River Herring: Impacts from Climate Change to Restoration

Thursday, December 17, 2020, 12:00pm – 1:00pm Save to Calendar

Join the Director of the Gloucester Marine Station to learn about river herring.

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After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the program.

Pricing

  • General Admission: Free
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Location

Online

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This event is handicap accessible

Full title — River Herring: Linking Across Life Stages to Improve Understanding of Impacts from Climate Change to Restoration

Exploring ecosystem connectivity, and the mechanisms available to coastal communities that advance resource stewardship, are critical during a time in which natural boundaries are increasingly uncertain and shifts in species and ecosystems are being witnessed that directly influence long-term sustainability. River herring are an ideal species for study of these topics, and the results are particularly important for maintenance of their populations.  

Adrian Jordaan is the Director of the Gloucester Marine Station (GMS) and an Associate Professor of Fish Population Ecology and Conservation in the Department of Ecological Conservation. He joined the University of Massachusetts Amherst (UMass) in September 2012 and began leading the revitalization of the GMS in 2015. His research employs quantitative modeling and statistical approaches to understand ecological patterns and life processes in marine, near-shore and freshwater systems. He is particularly interested in the sometimes-subtle links between ecosystems that are critical for sustaining ecological communities and human resources. From an applied perspective, he seeks to understand anthropogenic and natural variation within aquatic and marine animal populations and helps to develop effective regulatory, restoration, and social options for cross boundary ecosystem management. A critical part of this research focus is the engagement of fisheries practitioners and managers towards finding the “sweet spots” where science can advance sustainability and enhance access to resources.


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