The Wrack

The Wrack is the Wells Reserve blog, our collective logbook on the web.

Blog posts: News

  • Is the National Reserve System in Danger?

    | March 9, 2017 | Filed under: News

    The President's budget eliminates funding for the National Estuarine Research Reserve System in the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2018. The complete budget process includes Congress, however, which is demonstrating it has its own spending priorities.

    Last update: March 22, 2018

  • Some Estuary Love Out of Washington

    | March 3, 2017 | Filed under: News

    We like the sound of a new caucus announced this week. The Congressional Estuary Caucus is a bipartisan group focused on the importance of estuaries to the nation's environment, communities, and economy.

  • Wells Reserve Director Paul Dest Receives National Conservation Award

    | December 13, 2016 | Filed under: News

    Kennebunk resident Paul Dest, for 16 years the director of the Wells National Estuarine Research Reserve, was honored on December 12 with the 2016 Dr. Nancy Foster Habitat Conservation Award from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Dest was presented with his award at the National Summit on Coastal and Estuarine Restoration and 25th meeting of The Coastal Society in New Orleans.

  • New Research Director at Wells Reserve

    | July 20, 2016 | Filed under: News

    Dr. Jason Goldstein portraitWELLS, Maine, July 20, 2016 — Dr. Jason Goldstein is the new research director at the Wells National Estuarine Research Reserve. Goldstein will oversee the Wells Reserve’s fish studies, salt marsh restoration activities, and long-term environmental monitoring program. He intends to expand the reserve’s shellfish program, currently focused on green crab research, into lobster and Jonah crab ecology. Goldstein was selected after a national search and started at the reserve in June.

  • Wells Reserve to Help Beach Businesses Prepare for Storms

    | May 3, 2016 | Filed under: News

    Beach-based businesses, a powerful economic engine for Maine, are generally little prepared for storm surge and coastal flooding. Yet lessons learned from previous disasters underscore how important the recovery of businesses is to the overall recovery of a region’s economy.

  • Green Crabs Damaging Maine Salt Marshes

    | April 20, 2016 | Filed under: News

    Green crab burrowing activity is weakening salt marsh creek banks, causing them to erode.

  • A Fishy Tourney

    | April 1, 2016 | Filed under: News

    FOR CATCH AND RELEASE

    Fans Will Fill the Stands for this Fishy Tourney

    WELLS, Maine, April 1, 2016 — Even though New England teams were shut out of the Sweet Sixteen, there’s still no shortage of enthusiasm among the region’s faithful fans.

    Friends and staff of four National Estuarine Research Reserves — Wells, Great Bay, Waquoit, and Narragansett —are expected to line the banks of the Little River over the weekend for a fishy Final Four. The annual event, dubbed “Bleachers on the Estuary,” is sponsored this year by the Wells Reserve at Laudholm.

    Fans head to the stands for for the 2016 Bleachers on the Estuary event

    “It just doesn’t get any better than Marsh Madness,” gushed the reserve’s gizmo guy Jeremy Miller.

    “I’ve already filled out my brackish,” boasted reserve executive defector Paul Dest, drinking deeply from his mug of plankton-infused sea water. “Sea-run Brookies all the way!”

  • Dam Removal Opens Brook Habitat to Migratory Fish

    | September 21, 2015 | Filed under: News

    WELLS, Maine, September 21, 2015 — On September 18, a small dam was removed from Goff Mill Brook in Arundel near where it flows into the Kennebunk River estuary. The removal reconnects seven miles of stream habitat to the estuary, benefiting brook trout, other migratory and freshwater fish, and the watershed’s ecology. The project was coordinated by the Wells National Estuarine Research Reserve, working in full partnership with the Sebago Chapter of Trout Unlimited under TU’s national Embrace-a-Stream grant program.

    “Goff Mill Brook is now connected to the Gulf of Maine for the first time in at least 60 years,” said Wells Reserve project manager Jake Aman. “We expect many fish and wildlife species to benefit from this restoration, including commercially important fish like American eel and river herring.”

  • Mysterious Aquatic Creature Lurking in Wells Harbor?

    | April 1, 2015 | Filed under: News

    Jeremy Miller, research associate at the Wells Reserve at Laudholm, is no stranger to Wells Harbor. But lately in Wells Harbor, things have been getting stranger.

    For the past ten years, Miller has been coordinating the Wells Reserve's System-Wide Monitoring Program (SWMP), which, as part of a network of 28 water quality data collection sites across the nation, remotely samples coastal waters every 15 minutes, 365 days a year. Jeremy Miller works on equipment at Wells Harbor, unaware of the mysterious creature that would soon swim under the dock where he stands. Is that Webby?Gigabytes of data are annually collected by the SWMP program and scientists are increasingly using it to spot long-term changes in the Gulf of Maine and other coastal areas.

    But recently Miller, who is also the Maine state coordinator for the Marine Invasive Monitoring and Information Collaborative (MIMIC), saw something he'd never seen before.

    Or at least, he thought he did.

  • Wells Reserve at Laudholm Marks Solar Milestone

    | March 23, 2015 | Filed under: News

    The Wells Reserve at Laudholm has become the first nonprofit in Maine to meet 100 percent of its electricity needs with solar energy, with 248 solar panels that are expected to generate 73,000 kilowatt-hours of electrical energy while preventing 45 tons of carbon from entering the atmosphere each year.